This display celebrates the wooded landscape of Suffolk and East Anglia and how artists have responded to this aesthetically dominant yet magical covering of the landscape. 

Images are a small selection of work on display.

Wycliffe Stutchbury Hundred Foot Drain, 2017 Excavated bog oak, Chatteris, Camridgeshire 'My compositions from fallen and forgotten timber are studies in the narrative beauty of wood'. £2500.00 SOLD

Wycliffe Stutchbury

Hundred Foot Drain, 2017

Excavated bog oak, Chatteris, Camridgeshire

'My compositions from fallen and forgotten timber are studies in the narrative beauty of wood'.

£2500.00 SOLD

Henry Hitchcock Gypsies, 1965 Watercolour on paper Henry Hitchcock(1914 -2009) was born in London but as a child was sent to live with relatives at Thundersley, Essex, where he experienced an ecstatic vision of sunlight through trees in which ‘the sunlight on the bark and roots of the trees presented a scintillating, jewel-like vision of colour.’ He later lived in Norfolk and was acclaimed a child prodigy after his work was seen by Laura Knight.  He became a commercial artist but by 1964 he was able to become a full time artist through the patronage of the Duke of Bedford and support of Kenneth Clark.  His visionary art continued a tradition from Samuel Palmer but was infused with an air of surrealism.  His work features in the V&A and the Yale Center of British Art in the USA.   £2750.00

Henry Hitchcock

Gypsies, 1965

Watercolour on paper

Henry Hitchcock(1914 -2009) was born in London but as a child was sent to live with relatives at Thundersley, Essex, where he experienced an ecstatic vision of sunlight through trees in which ‘the sunlight on the bark and roots of the trees presented a scintillating, jewel-like vision of colour.

He later lived in Norfolk and was acclaimed a child prodigy after his work was seen by Laura Knight.  He became a commercial artist but by 1964 he was able to become a full time artist through the patronage of the Duke of Bedford and support of Kenneth Clark.  His visionary art continued a tradition from Samuel Palmer but was infused with an air of surrealism.  His work features in the V&A and the Yale Center of British Art in the USA.  

£2750.00

John Nash - Spectural Trees (No Frame).jpg
Henry & Joyce Collins (No Frame).jpg

John Nash CBE RA

Spectral Trees, Butley Forest, 1966

Watercolour and pencil on paper

John Northcote Nash (1993-1977) was the younger brother of Paul Nash. He had no formal art training and was encouraged to develop his work by his brother. He was an Official Artist in both world wars and specialised in landscape painting from the 1920s. He regularly visited East Anglia from the 1930s and eventually moved to Wormingford in 1946.

£4950.00. SOLD

Kate Sherman Picnic Bench, 2, 2015 (1 of a series of 4) Oil on plywood £380

Kate Sherman

Picnic Bench, 2, 2015 (1 of a series of 4)

Oil on plywood

£380

Comb-back Chair, 2017 by Among Trees Design.  English Elm and French oak. £950.00 Shown with Chelsworth Trees, 1977, by Michael Chase (1915-2001). Watercolour and pencil on paper.£850.00

Comb-back Chair, 2017 by Among Trees Design.  English Elm and French oak. £950.00

Shown with Chelsworth Trees, 1977, by Michael Chase (1915-2001). Watercolour and pencil on paper.£850.00


John Nash CBE RA Paths in the Woodland, c.1950s. Watercolour with pencil on paper On taking up landscape painting after World War One, Nash often combined his love of botany with his art by painting trees and woodland. His watercolours were especially celebrated in capturing something quintessentially British in landscape and this jewel-like study demonstrates his skill with its vivid sense of depth and woodland light and colour. Details of subjects, colours and sizes inscribed in pencil with triangulation lines throughout the composition are suggestive that this is study although it is highly worked up and signed. This painting was exhibited at The Fine Art Society in 1969 and was purchased by a collector in New England, U.S.A. £3950.00. SOLD  

John Nash CBE RA

Paths in the Woodland, c.1950s.

Watercolour with pencil on paper

On taking up landscape painting after World War One, Nash often combined his love of botany with his art by painting trees and woodland. His watercolours were especially celebrated in capturing something quintessentially British in landscape and this jewel-like study demonstrates his skill with its vivid sense of depth and woodland light and colour.

Details of subjects, colours and sizes inscribed in pencil with triangulation lines throughout the composition are suggestive that this is study although it is highly worked up and signed.

This painting was exhibited at The Fine Art Society in 1969 and was purchased by a collector in New England, U.S.A.

£3950.00. SOLD

 

Henry Collins & Joyce (nee Pallot) Collins

Collage Maquette for the Harlow Mural, BHS c.1980.

Mixed Media on board

Joyce Pallot (1912-2004) met fellow artist and designer Henry Collins (1910-2004) at the Colchester Art School in 1932 and the couple subsequently married in 1938.  Pallot studied industrial design at Southend-on-Sea whilst Collins studied at the Central School in London. They formed a dynamic partnership from 1948 designing murals and exhibitions, including the Sea & Ships Pavilion at the Festival of Britain and then later producing many large scale murals in new shopping centres across the UK.This is a rare collage maquette for the Collins’ Harlow Mural which was installed by British Home Stores. Their murals in Colchester were awarded Heritage Lottery Funding in April 2017.    

£2000.00

Mary Newcomb (No Frame).jpg

Mary Newcomb

Five Condemned Trees, 1994.

Pencil, heightened in white on coloured paper

Newcomb (1922-2008) was an instinctive and visionary artist who explored and captured the rhythms of nature and rural rituals - often captured the 'mark making' and patterns created by man.

£975.00  SOLD